Pre-Interview Planning: In-Person Interview 1

I will be interviewing Randy from Southern New Jersey on Friday, March 27 at his coffee shop, The Treehouse, in Audubon.

The Background 

Our third week of class this semester was canceled, but Elaine, Kristen, and I used the time to complete some work ahead of time for class. We met at The Treehouse to enjoy the coffee and the ambiance while we worked. About an hour in to our meeting, a group had formed in the space behind us, and they were watching a video via a large projector screen. We halted our conversation for a few minutes to see if we could figure out what the video the group was watching was about, and we begin to hear religious dialogue.

That’s when Elaine, a frequent customer at the shop, had a mini-epiphany. She said that she thought they were a group from a seminary school, and that she thinks they met there weekly. She also exclaimed–she couldn’t believe she had forgotten–that the owner of the shop was a youth pastor at his church and she believed he was still studying at seminary school.

I got in touch with Randy, the owner, through Facebook, and after hearing about his experiences, I knew he would be a perfect interviewee.

Around the time Randy was 13, he said that he felt God calling him to become to serve Him by working as a pastor. Eight years ago, he attended seminary for one year, and there he met the pastor of Oaklyn Baptist. Randy worked with this pastor as a youth pastor for seven years and was named Associate pastor last summer.

He shared that he and his wife, Tina, opened The Treehouse so that there would be a place people could feel God’s love and peace without it being shoved down their throat. They seem to enjoy running the small but warm, welcoming, and family-oriented business.

The Topics

In my research proposal, I mentioned that I had questions about millenials and their church going habits.This is something I hope Randy can shine a bit of light on, as he had been raised in a deeply faithful family and spent three to four nights a week at church in his youth. I’d be interested to see what it was that kept him so actively engaged in the church community. Adding to this topic, I would like to know more about what it was like to receive a calling from God about a path for one’s life, especially at such a young age. I wonder if it would be something obvious or subtle; after all, I’ve heard the phrase “a calling” many times, but I don’t have a clear picture of what that might mean.

As a student, the idea of schooling in preparation for becoming a minister is fascinating to me. I plan to ask Randy about the classes and lessons he had while at seminary. It might be interesting to see how it compares to a secular college experience, particularly in terms of practicality and applicability. I know teaching school was highly theoretical and not as practical as a teacher candidate might hope. I’m curious to see if this is a transferrable phenomenon.

Because he is a youth pastor, I’d also like to hear some of the ways he adapts messages to help engage and reach a younger audience. I wonder if this would include events outside of the weekly church service.

Finally, I would like to see if he can take me through The Treehouse and share some of the ways he feels the elements of the business reflect God’s love.

The Method

I will be preparing an outline based on the topics featured in the section above, and each item in the outline will have a list of potential questions to ask. The outline will have focus, which Brinkmann and Kvale mention as a major characteristic of a qualitative interview in InterViews: Learning the Craft of Qualitative Research Interviewing. The topics above focus on youth in church, which is a topic in which I have been extremely interested since the start of this research project. This will keep the interview from being too scripted but also too nondirective (34). I believe it will prompt my interviewee to share what he finds most important, and, as he is an expert in this area of the field, I am excited by the prospect of new information he might share with me.

I have already explained the purpose of the interview to Randy, as I included the details in my original introduction, but I don’t necessarily want to get to The Tree House tomorrow and start asking questions. In InterViews, Brinkmann and Kvale suggest that an interviewer can engage in a funnel-shaped interview, an interview that features a roundabout approach with indirect questions until the purpose is revealed later in the interview (156-7). I would like to try and start a general, more roundabout conversation with Randy before I jump into the questions, even though he already knows the purpose of the interview, because I want to work to establish a rapport of comfort and interest. This way, the interviewee will have a grasp of me, the interviewer, so that he can feel comfortable to talk freely and expose his experiences. Brinkmann and Kvale recommend this in InterViews (154), and they suggest that this can be established by showing interest, understanding, and respect for what the interviewee is saying.

I am a stranger, and I know that I would be nervous if a stranger were asking me personal questions about my religious beliefs.

Final Thoughts

Am I nervous? Extremely. This is the first interview I have had to conduct since I wrote for The Whit during my freshman year of Rowan. I used to rehearse interviews and phone calls that I would have to make and my palms would sweat through the process.

Knowing that I’m going into this with a plan, but a plan that is not set in stone, is nervous, but I know that I am taking a risk to develop my interviewing skills.

Practice makes perfect, after all.

Wish me luck!

Pre-Interview Planning: Online Interview 1

I will be interviewing Steven from Jakarta, Indonesia, through e-mail beginning Friday, March 27.

The Background

I met Steven through WordPress about three weeks ago. He commented on the blog post I wrote about Jefferson Bethke’s slam poem “Why I Hate Religion, but Love Jesus.” His comment focused on how Christians develop relationships with God, and it was the first comment I’d received from a reader outside of class. This piqued my interest, so I immediately went to his blog and started reading. Steven’s blog is subtitled “A vessel of honorable use,” which suggested to me that he was going to be focusing on serving God. I wondered how he hoped to do that, so I scrolled back through his posts and found his introductory post, in which he described how he wanted to try blogging to work through his revelations about God. He wrote that he had always done this in song form, and, because he enjoys writing, he felt he was ready and willing to try something new.

Steven’s blog has grown tremendously in the last few weeks. He has gone from writing brief posts to lengthy reflections on life and scripture. The development he shows in his writing suggests that his blogging is really having a positive effect on his spirituality, which is one topic I would like to focus on when I interview him. Brinkmann and Kvale in Interviews: Learning the Craft of Qualitative Research Interviewing suggest focusing the interview around particular themes rather than directive questions so that the interviewee can bring up what he or she finds important (34). I think this is a theme that would lend itself to a discussion about many significant details.

When Religious_map_of_IndonesiaI first reached out to Steven via e-mail, I was surprised to learn that he is only 17 years old and from a country that is predominantly Muslim. I feel as though it is rare to see someone so young so in touch with their faith and would also like to discover more about how a young man developed such a strong sense of self and faith this early in his life. Furthermore, I’d like to know a little bit about what it is like being a Christian in a predominantly Islamic nation. I am wondering if it develops a stronger sense of community among Christian believers or if it creates challenges in terms of worship. From what I read in his posts, it appears that worship music plays a significant role in his closeness with God. Therefore, this will also be something I hope to inquire more about through our interview process. I wrote two blog posts about worship music and Christian rock to develop a the background knowledge that would facilitate question development. Although Brinkmann and Kvale suggest that interviewers practice “deliberate naivete” or an openness to new and unexpected phenomena as opposed to “readymade categories and schemes of interpretation,” (33)  I wanted to have an understanding of the topic because I will have to form prepared questions and categories for analysis as I am not conducting an in-person, spoken interview.

The Method

I had originally hoped that Steven and I would be able to conduct an interview through interviewsSkype or G-chat because InterViews asserts that a research interview is a semistructured meeting that focuses on the subject’s experience of a theme (29). An online interview through a video-conferencing platform would have afforded the opportunity for conversation to flow naturally around several different topics. However, because of technological differences and a significant time zone difference, we will conduct our interview via e-mail. I do think, though, that because Steven is becoming an avid blogger about his faith that having him write his answers to e-mail questions might provide significant depth of knowledge and insight.

The only thing I will miss through e-mail is the embodied communiation that would come forth in an in-person interview. In InterViews, Brinkmann and Kvale write that “…bodies are never neutral but carry all their signs of gender, race, class, and so on…how people sit and comport themselves, how they smell and move, and how they are dressed…This may or may not affect the interaction…” (115) As a writer myself, I hope, though, that punctuation, writing voice, and style of the responses I’ll receive convey similar information.

The Questions

I plan on starting with ten questions, as pictured in the screenshot below. After I receive responses, I may feel compelled to ask more, and I am hoping that I will have the opportunity to send additional, follow-up questions via e-mail at that time.

Screenshot (45)

My Research Schedule–Tentative

Well, that’s it. Spring break has come to a close. I don’t know if I would call it a break, exactly, as I was very busy with tasks for both work and class. I was also busy working to network and make contacts. If anyone asked me a year ago if I thought I’d be networking, and handing out a business card, I would have laughed at them for hours on end.

That’s exactly what I did, though, this past week. I reached out to others, and I worked to steady my quaking nerves.

Over the last month, I have been working through both digital resources and print resources related to topics in religion and spiritual journeys. Now that I have begun to develop an understanding of some key aspects of faith, I am ready to begin conducting interviews and researching with experts and participants in the field. The image below is a tentative schedule for interviews, both in-person and online, as well as lookings during which I hope to “walk” through church services and the physical spaces of churches with experts in the field.

Screenshot (43)

I have a very busy schedule the next two weeks, but I am excited to get started with the research.

In preparation for these interviews, I am making lists of topics I would like to cover. If you are interested in reading more about the preparation process, check back on the blog on each of the “Pre-Interview” dates in the above table. This will explain what I hope to accomplish during each interview and how I plan to approach it.

Stay tuned!

Kendrick Lamar: Rapper or Vessel?

The senior cheerleaders on the team I coach were the first ones to introduce me to Kendrick Lamar. They asked if we could put his song “i” into our pep rally mega mix. I listened to the free clip available in the iTunes store and said it sounded good. When the girls brought the mix cd to practice, my heart almost exploded into my chest. There was some language coming out of the speakers in our high school gym that was much too explicit for me to have approved. I labored for hours to censor the swear words out of the mix without distorting the sound too much. I was sweating, but I was successful. All of the students loved the song and the routine.

Now, with this experience in mind, imagine my shock when I saw that Revelant Magazine tweeted a link to an article titled “Kendrick Lamar: All I am is a Vessel, Doing His Work.” Um, there’s no way bknation_Kendrick-Lamar-hoodie.jpgthat this could be the same Kendrick Lamar who was rapping about the the mother “effers” who doubted him. Why would someone who uses that language be calling himself God’s vessel?  My mind went back to media debate from a few years ago, started when Kathy Griffin won an Emmy and declared she wanted to thank everybody but God. Huffpost Live discussed this claim and the thanks to God that celebrities give after winning awards, a video in which Gospel music producer John Murray states,  “I just want your work to be at least church appropriate. If you can’t necessarily perform your work or at least go to church without feeling like a hooker in church, I think maybe you shouldn’t be thanking God.” I felt like Murray should be sharing this statement with Lamar.

Then, I clicked on to read Relevant’s article. The article was short, only two paragraphs in length, but it linked to a profile of Lamar the New York Times published today. The profile, seemingly purposed to address the spiritual and politic implications of his new album, To Pimp a Butterfly, shares the key aspects of his spiritual journey and relationship with God. As it turns out, Lamar considers himself to be “saved,” thanks to a grandmother of one of his teenage friends in Compton, California approached him in a grocery store parking lot following the murder of one of Lamar’s friends and asked if he accepted God. He goes so far as to call the woman an “angel for [he and his friends].”

Just because Lamar considers himself to be save, he maintains his humanity and recognizes that he is more susceptible to sin. This new album was a way for him to explore, reflect, and share the stories of his struggle. Joe Coscarelli, the author of the Times article, writes “[Fame] brought only more opportunities for sin and self-doubt, an internal chaos reflected not only in Mr. Lamar’s intricate stories but also in vigorous jazz- and funk-inflected production that builds on the smoother West Coast sounds of his debut.” Okay, so now, maybe  I can see how he would be working as a vessel. He’s sharing his constant struggle to do the right thing. Just because he isn’t what one would consider saintly doesn’t mean that he can’t be working to serve God.

As the picture to left of this picturuseyoue, which I conveniently found in my Facebook newsfeed when brainstorming for this post (coincidence?), reminds us, a servant of God doesn’t have to be perfect. If God found a purpose for Noah, Jacob, Moses, Rahab, and David, it doesn’t seem so absurd that he might find a purpose for a rap artist who liberally uses the “F” word. Perhaps Lamar is correct, and he can share the stories on his album because it’s part of God’s plan. Lamar is quoted in the Times article as saying, ” I know that from being on tour — kids are living by my music…My word will never be as strong as God’s word. All I am is just a vessel, doing his work.” Lamar doesn’t seem to be too prideful for his own good; in fact, he seems humble and understanding that he is a part of something bigger than himself. He seems like he wants to contribute anything that he can.

Knowing this, I went back and took a closer look at the lyrics from the song, “i.” The intro verse of this song reads, “I done been through a whole lot: trial, tribulation but I know God. The devil wanna put me in a bow tie. Pray that the holy water don’t go dry.”  The first sentence demonstrates that all of the difficulties Lamar has gone through but asserts that he has never wavered in his belief that God was with him. The second line that mentions the devil, according to Rap Genius contributors, alludes to funeral attire, as bow ties are often worn by the deceased. Because he hails from such a high crime area, it seemed likely that he would meet a fate similar to the terrible one of his friend. He looks to God though, the “holy water” to protect him and prays.

A majority of the song continues, arguing that as long as you love yourself, you can then love the seemingly dark place that is the rest of the world, as it is “illuminated by the hand of God.

As I write this, I have the song playing, and my mom is still complaining about Lamar’s language and her inability to understand any words besides the “bad ones.” I, on the other hand, have realized that maybe I shouldn’t be so quick to judge. After all, in addition to being religious and working to change the rap industry, Lamar doesn’t drink or smoke. He does say of himself, “From my perspective, I can only give you the good with the bad.”

If we can overlook some of his word choice, we can definitely see the good.

Dear Lauren: A Research-Related Surprise! Love, iTunes.

As you may know, this week, I’ve been working on a series of posts about religion, Christianity, and music. The first post touched on my experiences with music in church. The second post reflected on my impressions of three recommended worship bands. With this post, I’m examining how I’ve unknowingly been a fan of some Christian music for years and the implications of my discovery.

The Discovery

iphone-what-if-its-notNow, I’m a bit embarrassed to admit this, but my iPhone is like an additional appendage of my body. I take it everywhere with me, and I almost always have at least one app running throughout the day. Saturday night was no exception. While I was getting ready to go to a designer bag bingo fundraiser, I set my phone on the bathroom counter and turned the volume up as my iTunes Music app shuffled through my library. Relient K came on as I was steadying my hand to put on eyeliner. That’s when I heard the line.

“But the beauty of grace is that it makes life not fair.”

Good thing I hadn’t started drawing on my lid yet, because if I had, I’m certain I would have poked my own eye out in surprise. That line sounds extremely Christian, I thought as I put the eye pencil down on the counter. I started the song over and listened. Other lines from the song “Be My Escape” that struck me included the following:

  • “He’s told me the way and now I’m trying to get there.”
  • “I’m a hostage to my own humanity”
  • “I fought You for so long. I should have let You in.”

This may or may not surprise you, but in high school, I went through a major alternativRelientKRelientKe, pop punk music phase. Relient K’s Mmhmm was among one of my favorites. I had always thought “Be My Escape” was a song about a desired relationship, a song about a guy waiting to finally get the girl. Was I naive? Or just blissfully unware?

Perhaps because I’ve been researching religion and spiritual journeys lately, the lyrics so obviously reveal the speaker’s connection with God. I’m going to claim that I was unaware. As it turns out, Relient K is classified as Christian rock band.

The Findings

Formerly unbeknownst to me, Relient K’s second album, Two Lefts Don’t Make a Right…But Three Do, was nominated for a Grammy in the Best Rock Gospel album. Soon after, the band broke into the mainstream music scene in 2004 with the release of Mmhmm, an album that went on to peak in the top 15 of the Billboard 200 chart.

Adownload (1)fter sitting back and reading through lyrics of my favorite songs on Mmhmm, my favorite of the band’s albums, I feel like the band is having a conversation God rather than discussing love come and gone. For example, the song “The One I’m Waiting For” sounds, at first listen, like a song about a young guy wanting the popular girl and being rejected. “And she’s so confident that she’s what everybody wants. But nobody wants her to know that.” This girl is admired, and the singer is left in the cold, alone, tapping his foot in anticipation for the rest of eternity. “And I’m still waiting for you to be the one I’m waiting for.”

However, a more nuanced listen might suggest that the guy in the song isn’t just waiting for the girl to like him; he’s waiting for her to change, waiting for someone who would be worth waiting for. Waiting. For. Could “the one I’m waiting for” mean more than just waiting for her to be good enough for him? Could it mean waiting for her to be the one worth waiting until marriage for? Ah! Abstaining–there’s a definitive Christian value.

This discovery sparked further discoveries, as I scrolled through my iTunes library to see if anything else in my library related to Relient K.

I came across Anberlin‘s “Paperthin Hymn,” which shares the line “When life is in discord, praise ye Lord.” H220px-Paperthin_Hymnmmm.

I went to work on researching Anberlin and found that many of the band’s members call themselves Christian but that Anberlin doesn’t recognize itself as a Christian band. However, they also imply that some of their songs may have Christian messages. In an article cited on Beliefnet, lead vocalist Steven Christian (I promise, that’s his real name) shares, “I just simply write about life experiences, and when God comes out, then God comes out … But I’m also not going to inhibit that or I’m not going to try to create that feeling just to sell records to more Christians or talk about God less just to sell more records to the general market.”

The notion that their songs may also be interpreted as religious is also supported by the fact that the band was Tooth & Nail Records, a known force in the Christian music scene.

Much like Anberlin, Switchfoot, creators of the song “Meant to Live,” which declares “Dreaming about Providence and whether mice or men have second tries. Maybe we’ve been livin’ with our eyes half open. Maybe we’re bent and broken. We were meant to live for so much more,” is also often described as a Christian band. The members, also like Anberlin, work to reject this classification. Lead singer Jon Foreman, as cited on CTK Blog, states, “I am a believer. Many of these songs talk about this belief. An obligation to say this or do that does not sound like the glorious freedom that Christ died to afford me.”

Once again, I receive clarification that, yes, that so much more we are meant to live for might mean Heaven. It might mean God. The band writes and believes as they see fit, whether they have a label or not.

I not only possessed Christian music, but I enjoyed it.

The Meaning

If anything, my findings about some beloved songs from my high school days seems to have proven a few things for me.

1. Christian music isn’t something only for the highly devout. It doesn’t live in churches. It lives and breathes in our society. It’s enjoyed by Christians and non-Christians alike. It can interpreted as being about God. It can be interpreted as being about a relationship. It can be interpreted as the listener so chooses, meaning it appeals to a wide audience, and that’s key for success.

2. Christian music doesn’t have to be evangelical. It doesn’t have to be working to convert or change its audience. It can simply be about the artist sharing his or her feelings and his or her concerns. If others happen to enjoy it and relate, that is just a bonus.

3. Christians can clearly still have an edgy side. Guitar riffs, loud drums, and somewhat abrasive sounds can be found on each of these bands’ albums. It’s not something made for the stereotypical old church lady, a small Sunday school student and a teenager. It  can just appeal to the teenager.

And even though I’m not a teenager, it still appeals to me, and I will continue to rock out to it as I drive with my windows down.

No Way! Rock bands? In Church?!

Can you make a list of all the things the above images have in common?

I tried, and I came up with the following: a stage, lights, a backdrop, drumsets, guitars, microphones, and a massive crowd. It seems as though all the pictures depict rock concerts, and, as a sit behind I computer screen, I’m wishing I was part of the fun.

If I told you one of the pictures was different from all the others, would you be able to spot the difference?

In case you can’t, the picture that displays the insignia “FOB” is a photo from one of Fall Out Boy’s, yes–the mainstream pop punk band, shows. The other three are pictures from Hillsong, Citipointe Live, and Jesus Culture worship concerts. Yes, you read that correctly. Three of the photos are photos of worship bands, and yes, I did say I wish I was a part of the fun.

This past Monday, I decided I would do a series of posts on music in the Christian community after being inspired by the blogger weallseektruth’s suggestion that I listen to some popular worships bands, specifically those mentioned above. To get myself in the right mindset, my first post in the series shared my experiences with worship music and hymns up to this point.

I have since listened to several songs by each of the artists, and I would like to share my impressions of this new-to-me genre in hopes to connect with anyone who is as curious about it as I was.

1. Hillsong United

2e53fb39858620e0ae421c57d605b485Hillsong United is global megachurch, Hillsong’s, resident worship band. The band has 13 current members, ranging from guitarists, keyboardists, and percussionists. Of the 13 band members, 5 are singers, though they are not called singers but,fittingly, worship leaders. Since 1998, the band has produced 19 albums.
Their most popular song on Spotify, with over 19 million plays, is titled “Oceans (Where my Feet May Fail)”. It was the band’s first radio single and held the top spot on Billboard’s Hot Christian Songs chart for 26 weeks.

In terms of the lyrics, the song is about putting trust in God, even in the face of the unknown. The bridge, which is sung six times consecutively, reveals the singer’s unwavering faith that there is nothing to fear when following God’s calling. “Spirit lead me where my trust is without borders. Let me walk upon the waters wherever You would call me. Take me deeper than my feet could ever wander, and my faith will be made stronger in the presence of my Savior.” Not only is there nothing to fear, but together, the trust and the challenge, the lyrics assert, will make the speaker’s faith stronger. Repeating the bridge 6 times might seem like too much to an average listener, making the song almost 9 minute long, the repetition serves to prove that the speaker’s trust and dedication.

The song, sung by worship leader Taya Smith, features soothing guitar, powerful drums, and repetitious tambourine strikes. I, however, actually prefer an acoustic version the band recorded for Relevant Magazine that I found on Youtube . It’s so calming that I listened to it for about 20 minutes on repeat while reading yesterday.’

2. Jesus Culture

Jesus Culture isBand-033 a 7-piece band that has released 7 albums in the last 7 years. They expression their purpose on their church’s website, as a band meant “to bring people into an encounter with God’s love through worship and to disciple them to transform society.” Each band member works to live a lifestyle of worship and hopes that the music will provide listeners with a unique experience of God’s work.

Their most played song on Spotify, with nearly 4 and a half million plays, is “Love Never Fails.” This song is one about God’s grace and mercy, expressing that God’s love is never-ending, even in the face of tribulations. The repeated bridge in this song proclaims, “You make all things work together for my good.” Jesus Culture seems to be focused on reminding listeners that God has a plan and that there is no need to fear. God and His love will take care of all.

My favorite aspect of this song is that it is a live recording, and so the crowd singing along in the background is audible. It is a reminder that worship is a community experience, meant to be shared. While it may be presented in a “concert-like” experience and sounds like a sing-along, it’s more than that. It’s the sharing and perpetuation of a message in the form of celebration and song.

3. Citipointe Live

CommissionThumbCitipointe Live  hails from Citipointe Church in Brisbaine, Australia, and hope to see God glorified across globe. They look to “influence the world for good and for God.” They are a 5-piece band who have produced 9 albums since 2004.

Their most played song on Spotify, with 285,878 plays, is titled “Commission My Soul,” from their 2009 album under the same name.

Commission My Soul” shares a strong evangelical message, though in the lyrics, the speaker addresses God as the other songs did. It seems to be working to give purpose to one’s own life by helping others. “My life a living sacrifice,spirit empower me to set the captives free. My life is an offering.”

I have to say, I actually prefer the lesser played song, “On Top of the World,” which seems more similar to the other band’s works, declaring the greatness of God’s love with a strong upbeat rhythm, community singing, and lots of clapping from worship participants.

Final Thoughts

I found myself enjoying the worship music much more than I ever thought I would when I first starting hearing of the genre.  Maybe it was the comfort of guitars and drums.  Maybe it was the fact that It’s not overtly religious on the instrumental side; it’s very different from the single organ used for accompaniment in my church. It’s soothing and relatable while sharing valuable messages. At risk of sounding like a cliche, I felt at peace both physically and mentally while listening.

I’m now beginning to wonder, because it is so different, modern, and relatable, whether or not the intentions are both to praise God and make worshipping a more engaging experience than, say, that of the very tradition-focused Catholic mass. This is not to say that this would be a bad thing, but because many of the bands share similar goals about creating experiences between God and worshippers or listeners, it definitely seems like developing a new way of connecting is important.

Will it be something I listen to regularly as a soundtrack while I work? Probably not. I don’t think I’m around it often enough to reap the benefits of the community experience in which it seems so deeply rooted. I have, however, saved certain songs, especially Oceans (Where My Feet May Fail), for when the spirit moves me.

True Life: I Don’t Sing at Church

Sister ActNuns, choreography, pop renditions of hymns: we’ve all seen the iconic movie Sister Act, a film that injected a declining California Catholic church with the fun of Vegas-style entertainment. Maybe if Whoopi Goldberg had been my music teacher, the title of this post would have been different.

About a month ago, my family went to mass together for the first time in years. We sat in the pew, and I took one of the Breaking Bread 2015 hymnals from the shelf in front of me. I scoped out the board of hymnal number and bookmarked the page of each song that we’d hear during the service that day.

After each song was announced, the lone singer across the church rose and the organist pounded the keys to begin. Using the book as a guide, I sang along. And, allow me to clarify: by sing, I mean mouth the words practically under my breath. To be absolute, I never sing at church. It requires a level of confidence I just have never been able to muster. I glanced around at the surrounding pew occupants. I was in similar company. Everyone’s mouth was moving, but I didn’t hear any notes. No one was responding with the Responsorial Psalm.Sister Act 2

Not until the Gospel acclamation, when I heard someone behind me belting the words, “Alleluia, alleluia, alleluiaaaa.”

Curiosity got me, and I turned around in search of the powerful voice.

That voice was small but mighty. The person behind it was young, probably no more than 8 years old. He held no hymnal; he used his hands for emphasis. He seemed to be moving because he was so moved. His mom, who must have noticed me looking, put her arm across his shoulders and smiled at me. I panicked. Did she think I was judging him? I didn’t want to give the wrong impression, so I made sure to smile back before I turned around again.

I wish I could say I was so inspired that I sang the next hymn aloud, but I did not. I had heard a powerful voice, but it wasn’t my own. I wasn’t yet moved to sing.

Then, over the weekend, blogger weallseekhope’s post about worship popped up in my reader as though to give me some musical education. I’d heard the word used as a verb, but now it was being used as a noun. Jasmine equated worship with music. She talked about a worship team, and I became curious again.Was my church the only church of voiceless singers (I mean mouth-ers)? Were there more people as passionate about singing for God as the little boy who sat behind me last month? She informed me of the following:

…we do worship during church service, usually before the sermon, to prepare everyone’s heart to listen and receive the message.

Color me intrigued. It appears music in church can more than the transitional segue for mass than I have always classified it as.

She also recommended that if I wanted to see first hand what she meant by worship that I check out bands such as Hillsong United, Citipointe, Jesus Culture, and solo artists like Kari Jobe.

This confession, then, is the first in a series of posts about music and religion. My next will share my impressions of the recommended bands and artists. If you have another that you think I absolutely must check out, please leave a name or link in the comment section!

And, of course, I can’t end a post that opened with Sister Act without a grand finale. What have you sung for Him lately?